Posts Tagged ‘Ministry of Health’

UK Paramedic in Gaza: What I’ve been up to so far

April 19, 2014

Originally posted at Paramedics in Gaza

I’ve been in Gaza for nearly six weeks now, and I’ve largely found my feet. I plan my days around when there will be electricity, know when I’m being overcharged in a taxi and can drink 3 cups of sugary tea without getting the shakes. Countless meetings are finally paying off, and possibilities for work beyond observing are beginning to appear. This week I taught a First Aid session in the remote Bedouin community in the north, which I hope to repeat. Next week I’m teaching a basic trauma First Aid course for the Palestine Trauma Centre who sponsored us to come to Gaza. I’m particularly looking forward to it as the folks at the PTC have been so welcoming and do amazing work.

Beyond that, I’m working with the Ministry of Health to develop a training around ambulance pre-alerts to the Emergency Department, and making a presentation on the use of communications equipment in the UK ambulance service for their managers. They’re looking to develop in this area, despite the blockade on GPS and most communications equipment. The time I’ve spent here and conversations I’ve had increasingly point to equipment and economic limitations as the biggest issue for the health service here, rather than any lack of knowledge or ambition. Even when the present situation makes maintaining any service at all very difficult, there is an awareness of service improvement and a desire to plan for the future. I certainly don’t envy the managers here their jobs – it makes the UK’s National Health Service (NHS) look relaxed and over-resourced. Which is saying something.

I’m also meeting with the Red Crescent ambulance service to plan some work with them. (more…)

Israeli forces injure 5 medics after ‘targeting’ Gaza ambulance

April 12, 2014

Published yesterday (updated) 12/04/2014 10:05

 

(MaanImages/file)
GAZA CITY (Ma’an) — Five Palestinian medics suffered from excessive tear gas inhalation after Israeli forces fired a tear gas canister at their ambulance in the northern Gaza Strip, a medical official said.Spokesman for the Gaza Strip ministry of health Ashraf al-Qidra said that Israeli forces had “targeted” three military ambulances near the Eastern Cemetery east of Jabaliya.

The five medics were treated on the scene, he added.

The circumstances of the reported attack were not immediately clear.

An Israeli military spokeswoman had no information regarding the incident.

International Medics visit Ministry of Health Ambulance Depot

March 24, 2014

See Paramedics in Gaza for original post

Yesterday we visited the Ministry of Health’s ambulance depot in Gaza City. The government’s ambulance service runs alongside that of the Red Crescent, the Civil Defence, Military Medical services and some some small NGOs. The day-to-day emergency calls are predominantly responded to by the Red Crescent, but the Ministry of Health vehicles have the capacity to assist at busy periods and especially during conflicts.

They also run many community first aid trainings, health professional refresher trainings and have recently participated in some Majax (major incident) drills with other services. During quieter periods the MoH ambulances mainly run patient transfers, including taking dialysis patients to appointments, transferring between hospitals and taking patients to the Rafah and Erez border crossings for treatment abroad. They have about 30 intensive care ambulances and 67 first response vehicles, with 23 EMT-Is/nurses and 142 first responder (EMT-B) drivers. At present they are short of some nurses who have been recalled to hospital Emergency Departments due to staff shortages.

We had a long talk (and coffee) with a few different managers, who were all formerly on the road and will still get back into uniform in times of crisis. Then we had a look round some of the ambulances in the depot, talked to some of the crews and tried to get our heads round the huge issues facing the ambulance service here. In many ways, the ambulance service is a microcosm of Gaza in general. The complex problems facing it as a service are also the problems facing the wider population. There’s the huge issue of the Israeli blockade, now compounded by the political situation in Egypt. Then there’s the border closures, which leaves intubated patients waiting at the Erez crossing into Israel for hours while the medical team keeping them alive watch the oxygen and equipment batteries run down.

There’s the resulting scarcity of resources that means that the MoH ambulance have no non-rebreather masks (something that we use routinely and offhandedly back home) among many, many other items.  There’s the crippled economy, a government that can’t pay its workers on time and the resulting poverty and 50% unemployment rate. Then there’s the dependence on international aid, the lack of training opportunities and inadequate infrastructure. And of course there is constant tension and violence, with occasional vast and devastating military aggression.  In short, these broader issues combine in the health service to make the provision of even a basic standard of care exceptionally difficult.

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